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Student communications should run like a tattoo shop

By the power of Netflix, I’m burning through an average of 4 episodes a night of Miami Ink; a reality TV series featuring a tattoo shop, absurdly talented artists and a whole lot of semi-staged drama.

Tattoo artists have that special something

Six seasons of Miami Ink has taught me a tattoo shop works like this:

  1. Customer comes in with idea/printed Google Images/photo/Microsoft Word clip art.
  2. Tattoo artist works with customer on design.
  3. Tattoo artist sketches a (much better) design.
  4. Customer is excited.
  5. Tattoo artist creates work of art.
  6. Customer is ecstatically happy.

Apart from raw talent, how do you explain the outstanding results? They care.

They care enough to be honest with customers. Enough to educate them about why their idea sucks. Enough to work with them on a perfect solution.

I asked myself, “do I care enough?”

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Posted by on January 23, 2013 in student communications

 

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Social media for Student Services

Enrolment Services and Student Development and Services web content is evolving. Our content strategy will help students make connections between academic achievement, physical and mental health, involvement, and career building.

Student Services units will be represented within themed micro-sites, housing content based on student needs, not unit names. (Full migration to take place in 2013).

This new framework presents the question – should units continue to run separate social media profiles?

I’m leaning toward a central Student Services presence on social media.

 

All for one and one for all

Arguments against:

  • Some units have the resources and desire to speak to their own distinct audiences.
  • Some have existing online communities.
  • Some include social media tactics in their communications strategies.
  • Some have student contributors and that consistency is different to the tone and voice central Student Services channels will have.
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Let me share this whole new world with you

Student Communication Services at the University of British Columbia (UBC) was once a production shop. It went through significant changes before Janeen Alliston came on board last year remodelled the unit and its culture. We’re going to transform student communications at UBC.

One of our team meetings – ice cream boosts creativity. True story.

With Janeen’s leadership, the team now operates as an agency, where each of her Communications Coordinators provide strategic communications support for one to two of the fourteen student services units.

This team structure means we can match students’ information needs with each unit’s communications priorities, we can do away with competing messages and duplication, and we can organise communications in a way that is meaningful to students.

This blog post wouldn’t be possible without Janeen’s hard work and mind-blowing vision for student communications so please credit what you’re about to read to her (really, a lot of these words are hers).

Don’t you dare close your eyes

We have the data and we’re prepared to use it. Two key research pieces have helped us develop our new approach for communicating to students:

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Posted by on May 24, 2012 in student communications

 

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The face of 21st century education | Part 1

It’s no secret higher education has been slow to embrace social media. Most adoption can be seen through recruitment and PR. Some universities are doing well at involving students, faculty and alumni in valuable dialogue, but who’s representing social media in the classroom?

I applaud professors and instructors who rise above the ‘that’s the way it has always been done’ mentality as well as businesses with a vision to improve educational norms. Here are just a few examples to kick off my series on 21st Century education and surprisingly, not all professors are of the GenY persuasion.

Tweeting in class

Think back to when you were a number. One person in a lecture hall of 300. Was it difficult to have your question answered among a sea of raised hands? Or where you a shy student and didn’t want the room’s attention focused on a question your ‘stupid’ question. These case studies demonstrate the benefits of encouraging social media in the classroom.

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The face of 21st century education | Part 1

It’s no secret higher education has been slow to embrace social media. Most adoption can be seen through recruitment and PR. Some universities are doing well at involving students, faculty and alumni in valuable dialogue, but who’s representing social media in the classroom?

I applaud professors and instructors who rise above the ‘that’s the way it has always been done’ mentality as well as businesses with a vision to improve educational norms. Here are just a few examples to kick off my series on 21st Century education and surprisingly, not all professors are of the GenY persuasion.

Tweeting in class

Think back to when you were a number. One person in a lecture hall of 300. Was it difficult to have your question answered among a sea of raised hands? Or where you a shy student and didn’t want the room’s attention focused on a question your ‘stupid’ question. These case studies demonstrate the benefits of encouraging social media in the classroom.

Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Social media standouts at eduWEB 2011

The social media track for this year’s eduWEB conference seemed promising enough to justify the trip from Vancouver to Texas.

I can only comment on the social media track, but many of the attendees are stuck in a higher education bubble, have the same fixations as each other and have similar levels of social media sophistication. One attendee had been to eduWEB four years in a row and told me the presentations hadn’t changed much in that time. More on how I felt about the conference later.

There were two standout sessions for me.

The first morning of eduWEB began with pre-conference workshops. I attended a workshop presented by Fritz McDonald and Kate Beihl from Mount Mercy University. With Fritz’s direction, myself and around sixteen professionals involved in social media shared our on-the-job experiences.

My takeaways from The Conversation Tree: The Art of Social Media Content workshop:

  • Community managers are not the centre of the universe, but hold equal weight among the community.
  • Shouting how great we are from our soap box has limited value. We’re not going to repeat our mission statement every time we talk to someone.
  • Social media content is talk. Everything on social media happens because of talk (relationships, sharing, branding, community building). Everything is talk (photos, texts, games, bookmarks).
  • As you build your community, members may need spoon feeding, but they’ll soon spoon feed others. (Awesome soundbite from Kate).
  • Inspire your community to lead conversation and share content. Empower the community to run the community. Elevate community members into leadership and management positions. Give them a level of ownership and take the back seat – their involvement is more important than yours.

I was shocked to discover community managers treating their university social channels like personal accounts, e.g. being forwarded a ‘quirky’ YouTube clip by a friend, thinking this is super funny, and posting this to the university Facebook wall to generate discussion. It’s been my experience that university-related and valuable on-topic posts can generate thoughtful interactions. This tactic of posting ‘popular’ YouTube videos is condescending to say the least.

People like and follow you for reasons specific to your university. Trying to force engagement in this way is a cheap tactic and is not sustainable. Whether your community consists of prospective students, undergrad or grad students, they’re in the midst of an extremely complex period of their lives. They have genuine concerns and viewpoints on things affecting them and their world. If you post unrelated content that they can find through their own friends (and forwarded emails), how can you expect them to find unique value from your community?

Don’t assume they’re going to be interested in the same things you are, especially in your university’s forum. In the words of Diane McDonald from Texas A&M University, ‘It’s not my Facebook page where I insert my own wit and humor.’ This tweet from a US college illustrates my point:

The only other social media session worth mentioning is a presentation by Lauren Vargas from Radian6. She was engaging, knowledgeable and walked the walk. Lauren practised storytelling while preaching storytelling.

My takeaways from her session, The Nine Hats (and Counting) of a Community Manager:

  • Social media isn’t going to fix your marketing or customer service problems. Have your house in order.
  • Community managers are participants in the community, not owners.
  • It’s incredibly important to understand the consumer decision-making process. (I love this one because it speaks to the fact not everyone can ‘do social media’).
  • You must understand the environments and communities you want to embrace and identify relevant conversations.
  • Be externally-focused, use storytelling. You don’t write about yourself, the same with goes when representing your institution – It’s not about you, it’s about them.
  • You are a teacher for others in your institution. Figure out the golden nuggets to share with colleagues. You are the social media representative, find out how social media is affecting other departments and keep them in the loop.
  • Sync social media with business goals and map the entire process.

Lauren Vargas was by far the most captivating social media presenter and attendees at Fritz McDonald’s and Kate Beihl’s workshop were fortunate to gain insight into their peers’ use of social media.

It was a hit-and-miss event. This is the risk you run attending an industry-based conference and not a topic-based one. Much of the social media track was targeted toward beginners and left seasoned professionals wondering where higher ed has been for the last 4 years.

eduWEB should challenge presenters to deliver insightful and constructive sessions rather than advocate ‘this is why you should be on social media’ and ‘this is the difference between Twitter and Facebook’. We’re past that – especially for a $595 registration fee.

 
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Posted by on August 10, 2011 in university engagement

 

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Social universities part 3 | The UK

We’ve taken a look at how some Australian and US universities compare to each other with their use of Facebook and Twitter. It’s only fair to bring in the UK for round three. Or is it?

University of Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Twitter account is less formal than most university Twitter accounts. Its language is often casual and it doesn’t only push out news, it brings attention to events on campus, includes weather updates, and retweets relevant content.

Here’s one of my favourite examples of their tweeting. Cambridge link to an event listing, to the Cambridge Flickr channel and the Twitter account for the eight museums on campus. Well done.

Their use of hashtags can become a little overkill.

The University of Cambridge Facebook Page usually includes a short lead-in to articles posted on the wall, some are even framed as questions and generate thoughtful comments. Instead of dropping the entire URL into the status update, they should be shortening it with bit.ly to track click-throughs and shares. This data can be compared with Facebook Insights to determine which type of content is most popular and receives the most interaction.

Looks like they haven’t made the switch from FBML to iframes (phased out in March). Not so well done.

University of Oxford

The Twitter stream for the University of Oxford is filled with tweets linking back to news on their media page. They inform followers about events on campus and university programs, but they don’t connect with followers, their tone is unexciting and they don’t use hashtags … except for #FollowFriday, which they’re doing correctly and I can dig it.

The University of Oxford Facebook Page has turned the Discussions tab off, doesn’t allow fans to post on the all and doesn’t respond to fans’ comments on posts. They mix up the content, posting important updates for prospective and current student, giving kudos to professors and staff – though most link to the media page on their website. There must be a few admins posting on the wall. Sometimes URLs are dropped into the copy of the post (looks messy), sometimes it’s a bit.ly and the ‘voice’ of their updates changes back and forth.

University of Wales, Newport  

The University of Wales, Newport Twitter account is quite conversational and responds to followers. They do their followers a diservice, however, when they fill their stream with “please RT” tweets. This is how it looks as I write this article. 

Want to annoy your followers? This is how. Also, the Twitter handles you’re begging for a retweet are now put in an awkward position.

The University of Wales, Newport are quick to respond to questions from prospective and current students on their Facebook Page. They post a mix of videos, campus updates and general questions and don’t seem to mind others’ promotional spam on their wall. They attempted to resolve a student’s frustration on the wall, whereas my advice would be to move it to a Facebook message and comment that they’ve done so on her post. This shows others the situation is being handled privately, the student can feel comfortable giving extra details and Carl Peters isn’t vilified in public.  

The University of Aberdeen

“The University of Aberdeen is the fifth oldest in the UK and is at the forefront of teaching and research in medicine, the humanities and science.”

They’re definitely not at the forefront of social media! Their Twitter account is an automatic news feed, with no personality and no real-time updates. It’s also confusing to see universities like Aberdeen naming themselves one thing on Twitter ‘Aberdeen University’ and another elsewhere ‘University of Aberdeen’.

This copy is found on the Info tab of the University of Aberdeen Facebook Page:

:At Aberdeen we’re always interested to hear what you think about the University. Whether you’re a student here, an alumnus or are considering coming to the University, please feel free to leave us your comments, email us or check out our wall for what’s going on around the campus.”

Aberdeen show no regular presence on this Page. Prospective students are asking how to apply and have questions on accepting their offer with no official answer – missed opportunities? Spammers are also taking advantage of the lack of Aberdeen maintenance.

Aberdeen’s last post was on July 8, “We’d just like to say congratulations to all of our students that graduated this week. You made it!!! Don’t forget to join our Alumni facebook page!” Why should they if this is the standard you’re setting?

Queens University Belfast

Queens University Belfast runs its Twitter account through the web and not a social media dashboard such as Hootsuite. Makes life harder than it needs to be. At graduation time, for two weeks straight the account only tweeted about graduation. What about those followers not concerned with graduation?

Then there’s this:

This type of tweeting hurts my heart.

The Queens University Belfast Facebook Page shows many automated tweets, though you’ll also find events, photo uploads and campus updates. They are regular with posts, mainly seen with links to press releases.

There you have it. Out of the universities I’ve explored, Australia is ahead on Twitter, the US is ahead with customised tabs on Facebook and the UK? Um … Cambridge is doing well.

Next up – Canada.

 
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Posted by on July 21, 2011 in university engagement

 

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